Hailing from Edinburgh, Fuzzystar is the latest exciting artist to emerge from Scotland’s fruitful music scene. Crafting an off-kilter indie sound full of rich lyricism, the artist otherwise known as Andy Thomson looks set to follow a long line of acts from the country who have perfected the fine art of emotion-driven indie-rock.

Building up to the release of his forthcoming album Telegraphing on 28th April via Satellite Sounds, he has recently unveiled an infectious track called ‘Angel Transported’. Full of scuzzy guitars, catchy riffs and upbeat rhythms, it’s a track that immediately grabs your attention while also revealing an emotional depth through its softly stirring lead vocal. Effortlessly oscillating between quiet moments of reflection and huge guitar hooks, it’s a sure sign of bright things to come from the outfit.

GIGsoup caught up with Andy Thomson, to hear more about the track and what’s coming up….

Can you tell us a bit about ‘Angel Transported’ and the inspiration behind it?

It was written just after I’d moved back to Edinburgh from London. I was living in or near places I’d spent a lot of time as a teenager and in my early 20’s, but things had moved on and changed. People I knew had got married, moved away, had kids etc. We were all bit less crazy – or at least should know better. I was also just thinking about getting older and being around some of those streets years before and things that had happened like a relative that wasn’t with us anymore and acquaintances that had passed away. Basically, the first realisations that this was what was going to happen from here on in… trying to make sense of it all and what you should do with your life when you’ve already done some of the things you really wanted to and they didn’t live up to the hype… That sounds cheery doesn’t it!

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 It comes from your forthcoming album Telegraphing, which is due for release later this year. What can listeners expect from the album?

I guess theres lots of melody, stories in the songs. Hopefully something a bit deeper in there too that might reveal themselves a bit more on repeated listen. That’s the hope anyway…

Did you always have an idea of how the album would sound or was it a developing process?

I always wanted it to be an album, and for there to be some variations and different shades in amongst the melodies. I love records where there’s one approach or mood and that’s the record, they’re great! But I wanted to try and make something that was just a little broader.

It was the first record I’ve ever made in a formal way and was made with some really good folks so hopefully we managed some of that. It’s really for everyone else to decide that for themselves though. I think we captured enough of what I hoped for and left enough there to give me ideas for a future record.

Scotland’s music scene is in particularly good shape right now. Why do you think this is?

There’s a really good network of organisations, blogs, publications, venues, creatives, promoters and musicians who support each other whilst all trying to do their thing – that’s definitely part of it! And that community cuts across genres or musical trends. For the amount of people and artists there are, it’s surprisingly diverse and in my experience the people involved don’t really care too much what genre you play and whether it’s their regular thing.

Maybe a combination of the overall size being too small and being removed enough from elsewhere that people follow their own thing without getting too hung up on trying be part of the latest trend. Central Scotland having a great legacy of indie bands as listenable today as 20 years ago also perhaps instills some of that confidence not too worry too much about the present.

How does the Edinburgh scene differ to the Glasgow one?

It’s definitely smaller. It’s hard for me to say too much really as I’m not as involved in the Glasgow scene, except more so as a gig goer. I think they’re both great, it’s just Glasgow has bigger numbers and more bands – the crowds there are brilliant too.

What are your plans and ambitions for the year ahead?

Get the album out finally! Tour it and play more gigs and festivals outwith our usual haunts. Perhaps return to Paris again if we can fit it in and start thinking about the next record and keep writing new songs.

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