Having released a series of albums on Bandcamp since 2014, multi-instrumentalist electronic artist Lo Five came to wider attention with his 2017 album When It’s Time To Let Go. Released via Patterned Air Recordings, it received positive reviews from a number of publications including two of the best print magazines around in The Wire and Electronic Sound.

In addition to releasing his own material, Lo Five is also heads up the Emotion Wave crew which puts on regular events showcasing local electronic artists. At Future Yard they will be curating Reformat where Lo Five will be joined by Polypores, Foxen Cyn, Bye Louis and DJ Luna, with a limited edition floppy disc EP also being available exclusively to those who attend.

In the third of our series of interviews with the Future Yard line-up, we spoke to Lo Five about his music and his upcoming appearance at the festival.

For someone who may never have come across your work before, how would you describe your music? And if you could recommend them one of your songs, which one would that be?

I’d describe it as warm, fuzzy, melodic, instrumental sounds that are concerned with life, consciousness, love, family, memories and death. My new album (out soon via Castles in Space) is more about rhythms and textures, more chunky beats. There’s a fair bit of variety in my back catalogue, but I quite like ‘Infantile Progenitor’.

Who or what have been the biggest influences on your sound?

I think subconsciously just listening to stuff my Dad played on guitar around the house, from the day I was born until the day I left home – basically anything melodic that happens to tickle that synapse. I like music that sounds aged or distant, like a foggy memory. I like things that sound like they’re coming from a ‘real’ environment from a real person rather than out of a computer. I like music that makes me feel elated or profoundly sad.

How well do you know Birkenhead and wider Wirral area?

After a hefty stint in north Liverpool I’ve lived on the Wirral for 10 years, so you know, fairly well – it’s the leisure peninsula, the oblong of dreams. I’m officially a wool.

What’s your favourite festival memory, either as a performer or as a fan?

I’m a bit biased obviously, but we put an all-day mini festival on at Birkenhead Priory last year called A Day in the Sun, which was amazing – having loads of superb artist and DJ friends we’ve come to know through Emotion Wave playing the grounds of a beautiful ancient monastery. It’ll be so nice to revisit it again exactly one year later. it’s a stunning spot and unlike anywhere else I’ve ever been, perfect for a festival.

Apart from yourselves, who would you recommend people go see at Future Yard?

I like Szun Waves, Forest Swords too, always pushing creative boundaries and thinking beyond the music. There’s a real fun buzzing DIY scene with emerging bands and artists too right now – check out Beija Flo, Brad Stank, Trudy and the Romance… I could go on to be honest, there really is so much good stuff on, you can’t go wrong.

Why should festival goers take time out to come and see you play? What can they expect from your performance at Future Yard?

I think the thing we’ve got going on with Emotion Wave is pretty unique, as there are some incredible electronic/experimental artists coming up around Merseyside. I think people should expect something very atmospheric that possibly takes them out of their gig comfort zone, in a good way. Imagine coming to church on a Saturday after being spiked, then enjoying the service even more than usual – something like that.

Lo Five will be performing at Future Yard on the Saturday at Priory Chapel & Green from 18:00, where he will be opening the Reformat showcase.

You can hear more music by Lo Five over at Bandcamp. He can also be found on Facebook.

For more details about the festival, including how to purchase weekend and day tickets, head over to FutureYard.org

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