Montreal singer, songwriter, and guitarist, Patrick Krief, is getting ready to release a new album, Dovetale. Today, we share the lead single, “Take the Night” which has a dark, bluesy sound while offering the open-heart poetry and lush arrangements that Krief is known for.

Listen to ‘Take The Night’ and checkout our conversation below…

Can you talk to us about the inspiration for your latest single ‘Take The Night’?

The song is about betrayal, and letting go of toxicity. I was listening to a lot of Tom Waits and Old Polish waltzes when I wrote the music. The lyrics came at a difficult crossroads in my life and the song really helped me through it.

How has your community contributed to your success? 

Being Canadian, I’ve had access to some great assistance from FACTOR which made a lot of my success possible. As a Quebecer, I’ve also had a lot of support from within the community and press in this province.

What advice would you give other musicians? 

Don’t blindly follow any random path you think will lead you to success. There is no magic potion or easy path. Do what you love doing, and do what you’re great at, seek to improve and expand your skills daily. Be tenacious, be persistent, know when to move onto the next project, and don’t expect an easy ride.

Above all, stay in love with music, and if ever you find yourself surrounded by people who aren’t. RUN.

Describe to our audience your music-making process.

Typically I get an impulse that tells me to get to an instrument. It’s usually a strong compulsion and I have to treat it with urgency as it’s fleeting. Once I get to the instrument, a bit of noodling around leads to music forming. One chord leads to another, I start humming over it, I fumble for the voice memo recorder in a panic, trying to get it all down in a hurry before it escapes me. After a few months I’ll go over all the memos (which seem foreign to me) and I can quite objectively decipher which ones I feel are great or not.  From there it becomes a question of finesse. Handling it with care, and trying not break the connection with inspiration. At some point I’ll get to arrangements. I’ll choose a beat, write guitar parts, bass lines, keys, strings etc. Almost as though I am composing a score for the visuals in my mind. Once the music and melody are set, I’ll spend a week or two jotting down lyrics and asking myself “what is this song about?”.

How did it feel when you released your debut single? 

It’s always a bit nerve racking to put music out there. The work never truly feels finished until it’s out.

If you could collaborate with any musician/band, who would it be? And why?

I’d love to work with Bob Dylan. Just to watch him work and witness his process.

What first got you interested into music? 

I grew up in a very musical family. I’ve been around music my entire life, so it’s hard to pinpoint a specific moment. I’d say it’s likely watching my uncle walk around his place playing flute, or guitar.  He is such a musically gifted human being with an incredible voice, and his mother (my grandmother) would play piano and sing, as well (she was a music teacher). Trips to that house were all about art. Every Saturday we’d spend the day drawing, painting and playing music. In my own home things weren’t much different. My parents always had music on (Paul Anka, Neil Diamond, Dianna Ross, Ray Charles, The Beatles etc)..  My mom was quite serious about oil painting as well, so there was always something going on. But my biggest breakthrough came when my brother officially introduced me to The Beatles at age 6.

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