Originality80
Lyrical Content75
Longevity70
Overall Impact70
Reader Rating0 Votes0
74
Ostrar mixes referential and autobiographical themes, confirming definitely that the most amazing feature of an author is how music, but also art in general, could be a personal way to cure and release ourselves

Songwriter and veteran band leader of the last twenty years Adam Busch alias Adam Ostrar has released his second solo alternative-folk record ‘Brawls In The Briar’.

The opening is with the melancholic ‘Enemy’. During all this piece, the bass guitar seems to predict that something is happening, that someone is coming and we can only wait for in a state of fluctuating suspension. Maybe, is it truly the enemy?

Closing eyes while listening to ‘Warlock’, it’s easy to go back until the vintage folk of 50’s-60’s American western movies, watching a cowboy with a white horse riding to discover the horizon and beyond (“And now you are riding into the great beyond”).

With ‘Cossacks in the Building’ the author deals with political matters straight lived by his family: “I remember my grandfather telling me who the Cossacks were and what a pogrom was. I know there was a pogrom history on his side of the family, and his parents and aunts and uncle ultimately immigrated to the U.S. in the early 1900s because of persecution.” (Supersecretrecords.com). The reference is about the Russian meddling in U.S. elections and of course, you if you’re from a family that has already felt the heavy hand of Russian authoritarianism and racist scapegoating, this is doubtless a little more creepier for you.

On Supersecretrecords.com, Ostrar also talks about the recording: “Point being, there aren’t any distractions. We recorded it live, all in the same room. I guess I made a record the way lots of people have made records, but it was a first for me. I’m used to piecemeal recordings and piecemeal recording budgets.” And also: “I wrote the bulk of the songs in 2016, which was collectively an awful year for obvious reasons. I was also experiencing cognitive dissonance unrelated to the election, personal stuff. All of it worked itself into the material. I suppose the backdrop of 2016 is the briar. The songs are the brawls.”

Ostrar mixes referential and autobiographical themes, confirming definitely that the most amazing feature of an author is how music, but also art in general, could be a personal way to cure and release ourselves.

This album feels like a secret album that people make, in some way, as their own.

‘Brawls In The Briar’ is out now via Super-Secret Records

Adam Ostrar