Originality50
Lyrical Content75
Longevity75
Overall Impact70
Reader Rating0 Votes0
68
The debut full length release from the quintet hailing from Washington State is an unrelenting barrage on the ear drums that penetrates the soul and crashes through your core

As the bleak and cold winter days sink their teeth into the fabric of society, many look to envelop their minds in thoughts of sunny beaches and BBQ’s. The Drip however have other ideas, looking to drown listeners in the harsh realities that many endure.

The debut full length release from the quintet hailing from Washington State is an unrelenting barrage on the ear drums that penetrates the soul and crashes through your core. With clear influences from bands such as grindcore pioneers Napalm Death and the groove laden Trap Them, The Haunting Fear of Inevitability explodes out of the speakers with openers Blackest Evocation and Anathema, smacking you across the face and leaving little room for confusion as to what you’ve gotten yourself into. It’s no surprise that this album stays on this track for the remaining 11 tracks.

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Quick bursts of rampant riffing follow, leaving your head spinning and unsure if you’ve just entered a war zone. With Covered in Red being the longest song on the record, clocking in at 3:34, this isn’t an album that will take you on a sonic journey or test your brains capacity for absorption. It offers more of an unforgiving intensity that smothers and claws its way around you, offering no escape. The punishing, savage vocal delivery of Brandon Caldwell, accompanied by break neck speed riffing from Bobby Mansfield and Blake Wolf litter this album with inescapable blasts of heaviness. The thunderous drum work of Shane Brown is headache inducing and sets the tone throughout, leaving your stomach shaking and eyes bulging.

This album continues to attack the senses into the home stretch, with In Atrophy, The Answer and Exile exuding continual bouts of nihilism and lyrical content exploring many dark themes such as death. Disclaimer: this isn’t the type of album to play ‘round your Grandmother’s house. Consigned to Fate and Bone Chapel close this album, reaffirming the crush, kill, destroy mentality that this album undoubtedly personifies.

Although this album is not massively original in its nature and pace nor completely free of flaw, for a debut full length album, The Drip are showing flourishes of being a band that could be torch bearers for this scene in years to come. 

This band and this album aren’t made for main stage festival appearances in the sun, with the audience singing along with a beer in their hand. This is for a dark November night in The Camden Underworld, plagued with mosh pits and intense walls of death. Judging by the ferocity and uncompromising attitude exhibited across this album, I’m sure that The Drip are just fine with that.

The Drip ‘The Haunting Fear of Inevitability’

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