Originality75
Lyrical Content90
Longevity85
Overall Impact75
Reader Rating0 Votes0
81
On his latest long player, Ghostpoet continues his hypnotic accounts of the social and political climate of inner city life, always the urban messenger

Rolling, dusty, tight drums, a bass guitar and a wailing, distorted lead. A lazy, London inflected drawl ripples on top and Ghostpoet is back with his chronicles of a hazy, late night London life.
Picking up for where he left off in 2015’s ‘Shedding Skin’ (“Life is hard, life is shifty, stretching Pounds out, living nifty”), he’s still the troubled man looking for contentment.

‘Trouble + Me’ was the second track lifted from the aptly named Dark Days and Canapes. The comforting yet morose guitar smacks of Radiohead’s ‘Street Spirit (Fade Out)’ whilst the lyrics hark of similar concerns to Marvins Gaye’s ‘Trouble Man’. A fitting 2017 sequel to both -“Manic times, Voddy with a little lime, calm the nerves, the beds made, I best stay, the devils at the door”

As the album progresses there’s more atmospheric , electronic melodic notes , each track feeling like the most personal diary confession. Dramatic orchestration and pleading female vocals from Eera perfectly offset Ghostpoet’s frustrated queries on the call and response track ‘Dopamine if I do’.

‘Freak Show’ and ‘Oh Woe is Me’ could form soundtracks to a blurry night in Soho, developing further a character who’s always facing the moral dilemma, “I shouldn’t ….but….”
“Knocking down the spirits until you drop to your knees”

Immigrant Boogie is a brave, politically relevant track- ‘I was dreaming of a better life with my two kids and my lovely wife but I can’t swim when waters in my lungs, so here it ends when life has just begun’. Against the sound of an aggressive tide and menacing guitars , the listener is given a first hand reflection of an immigrant journey to a land of perceived safety.

On his latest long player, Ghostpoet continues his hypnotic accounts of the social and political climate of inner city life, always the urban messenger. Elements of Massive Attack, Portishead and the industrial urban sound of The Prodigy’s ’Fat of the Land’ are all here. The late night London bard is doing what he does best, reflecting with honesty the highs and lows of modern living – ‘Dark Days and Canapes’.

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