Originality75
Lyrical Content60
Longevity70
Overall Impact80
Reader Rating0 Votes0
71
There’s always been something about the vivid and simplistic connection between analogue synths and acoustic instrumental tones, perhaps that is what makes Warm Digits’ latest album, ‘Wireless World’ so unexpectedly progressive

There’s always been something about the vivid and simplistic connection between analogue synths and acoustic instrumental tones, perhaps that is what makes Warm Digits’ latest album, ‘Wireless World’ so unexpectedly progressive. Without proper research into the duo’s past, one could have foreseen a possible generic, Mancunian-nostalgia riddled, waste-of-space LP; with droning voices similar to that of a grown man whining about losing his 72pence avocado to a pack of hungry and feral homeless men.

Instead, what ‘Wireless World’ has been made up of is cool and smooth- no, wait – a dastardly melodic, instrumental acid journey of the roughest and sharpest patches throughout the years of the analogue: A time when the land and radio was overridden by Kraftwerkian-type floating heads (no reference to the fabled Rick and Morty here), all soaring away in an elegant manner, much like the great South-American Albatross.

Perhaps it is the technique of adding a personal touch on multiple genres throughout the album that generates that ‘punches above and beyond’ feeling? Take ‘End Times’ for example, Warm Digits and their friends, Field Music, have set about on creating a blend of new school funk and… maybe Icelandic synth pop? By adding the fingers and boots of the God-like behemoth known as Bootsy Collins and stirring it with Icelandic glacier water and the countries latest national treasure, Fufanu, could Warm Digits birth out such a wild, bass-driven and harmonious track.

Hidden amongst the twelve-piece record, is yet another melodious hymme (French for ‘Anthem’, AKA: Banger), inconspicuously named ‘Fracking Blackpool’. Is there fracking in Blackpool? The city which falls shortly behind Skegness for Britain’s roughest and most sarcastic side-eye holiday getaway. The answer is yes. Does it make the coastal city look any better? Eh. The people and the lights are nice though.

To even dent the story of how great and unique ‘Wireless World’ is, would only go and completely destroy the firm laws of the word count. So, to briefly sum up the magnificence of this mellow and almost retro interwoven super-species album, a quote from David Cameron should be necessary: “The political system is broken, the economy is broken and so is society. That is why people are so depressed about the state of our country.” Or something along those lines at least.

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