Originality90
Lyrical Content80
Longevity75
Overall Impact90
Reader Rating3 Votes64
84
The dogged stoicism and yearning for a healing heart cascade with synths, guitars and Harry McVeigh’s vocals. The rich harmonies promise the listener that despite all this despair, there’s actually a spatter of hope, if you just give it a go

White Lies are certainly not sinking in their gloopy pool of darkness; they’re butterfly kicking straight through it. They released their fourth album, ‘Friends’, earlier this month, which thrives in break-up and heartbreak. This time, the three man band sound all the more grown-up.

Their fame climbed through Reading and Leeds festivals, and euphoric tracks such as ‘Death’ and ‘Unfinished Business’ during the late noughties. Their fourth album, ‘Friends’ was released earlier this month, which relishes in White Lies’ trademark comfortingly dark musings on love. Just read through their track list and you know this is no MIKA.

As NME once wrote about them following their debut album in 2009, “[t]here’ll be no glitter-strewn glam period for these lost souls; the Dark Music’s got them for good”, there’s no taboo for White Lies that life can be a bit of a hot mess.

The quest for truth marches throughout ‘Come On’, with the thumping synths. Harry McVeigh’s vocals are triumphant in, piquing in choruses like ‘Take It Out On Me’ and ‘Right Place’. Lyrics like “I took the life and soul from every dream” (‘Swing’) boom with confidence.

‘Morning in LA’ is not so in line with the other punky europhoric tracks, sounding more like Keane. Then again, ‘Friends’ is generally slower, more mature, than the jumpy excitement in previous albums. White Lies have matured through the gloomy world they see. Instumentals are more stretched out in tracks like ‘Hold Back Your Love’ and ‘Don’t Want To Feel It All’, with the often-repetitive vocals in choruses imitating this stripped down, raw message of heartbreak.

The dogged stoicism and yearning for a healing heart cascade with synths, guitars and Harry McVeigh’s vocals. The rich harmonies promise the listener that despite all this despair, there’s actually a spatter of hope, if you just give it a go.

‘Friends’ is available now via BMGWhite Lies 'Friends'

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