Covering yourself under the cloak of anonymity as an artist can certainly have its perks, as we have seen from the mysterious South London producer Burial. Having remained faceless until 2008, where it was revealed that Burial was the project of Will Bevan, he still retains a low profile and is yet to perform a live show. Bevan gained a cult like fan base due to his truly original and highly evocative style of music which he displayed on his self-titled debut album in 2006, and again on his critically acclaimed 2007 follow up ‘Untrue’.

[contentblock id=141 img=adsense.png]

Having released only a few EP’s in the 9 years since the release of ‘Untrue’, Bevan has come out of hibernation to present two new tracks, ‘Young Death’ and ‘Nightmarket’. The 2015 track ‘Temple Sleeper’, was the last release from Burial and saw Bevan venturing out beyond the usual sounds and vibe that he had created with his previous works. On this EP, Bevan returns to a style more akin to that of ‘Untrue’ combining sorrowfulness with a certain degree of hope and longingness with two beautifully atmospheric tracks.

However, instead of the shuffling drums and cracking percussion samples that Burial has become synonymous with over the years, this EP demonstrates the more ambient side of Bevan’s productions, similar to that of ‘Endorphin’ or ‘In McDonalds’ from his ‘Untrue’ album.The vocal samples on ‘Young Death’ offer dreamy reverberated beds for the low pass filtered synth and minimal beat to sit on. The track’s optimistic lyrics state “I will always be there for you” and “don’t cry, don’t fear”. A message of pain and longing is certainly evident when listening to the track.

[contentblock id=143 img=iframe.png]

The second track, ‘Nightmarket’, displays Burial‘s sampling of obscure field recordings and other worldly sounds. This is coupled with a synth that would be a perfect fit in an 80’s science fiction movie soundtrack.  The prominence of such a synth on this track, makes it quite a idiosyncratic Burial track and thus sounds dissimilar to much of his previous work. ‘Nightmarket’ is broken up by the moments of typical Burial ambience, with there being at one point what sounds like a plane’s engines turning off.

The two track EP makes for an immersive and fascinating listen and is potentially an indication of an upcoming long release from Bevan. Whatever the case, the atmospheric allurement of the EP once again establishes the hope of not having to wait long before we hear Burial’s next musical endeavours.

Burial 'Young Death/Nightmarket'

Facebook Comments

%d bloggers like this: