Whoever said that punk is dead needs a good slap in the face and then kindly pointing in the direction of Leeds trio Accident/Happy. These Northern lads are bringing everything that is good and pure in the world of punk: angsty, frank and relatable lyrics with ballsy yet bouncy riffs and reminding us why we fell in love with the genre all those years ago. 

With their self-titled debut EP waiting into explode into your ears, Accident/Happy make their mark with a well structured, catchy quartet of songs. Picture yourself in a dark, underground venue, with sticky floors and sweat inhaled with every breath: this is where we imagine Accident/Happy would thrive with this EP, in a place where the atmosphere of the music is all that matters. Put it this way, with tracks like this, these boys will be creating chaos and mosh pits in no time.

[contentblock id=141 img=adsense.png]

From the offset, when blasting out ‘Not As Easy’ and ‘The Silence’, we immediately see that Accident/Happy are definitely not a trio that hold anything back. The powerful bass coupled with thundering drums creates the most delicious marriage that we cannot get enough of. The building of riffs and guitar solos, particularly in ‘Not As Easy’ create an instant, head banging classic that is dying to be blasted out of the biggest amp you can get your hands on. 

Vocalist and guitarist Dan Dunn amazes throughout this EP with his accomplished, perfectly punk and sometimes gritty vocals, all the while providing killer riffs without letting one compromise the other. Striking that balance in itself is not an easy thing to achieve, but he performs effortlessly. Dunn’s efforts particularly in the chorus of ‘Gary’s Last Stand’ are extremely commendable and with talents such as these, he has the makings of a truly fantastic frontman. 

Arguably saving the best until last with ‘My Heart is a Cannibal’, drummer Aaron’s powerful percussion is awe inspiring, and could leave you with broken bones if left unsupervised, but in the greatest possible way. It’s only niggling factor is that you’re almost begging for it to be a few seconds longer, as you’re not quite ready to say goodbye to this song, or indeed this EP, quite yet.

Facebook Comments

%d bloggers like this: