This Holy Oysters article was written by John Gittins, a GIGsoup contributor. Edited by Gavin Wells

Easily picking up the hypothetical ‘Best Band Name of 2015’ award, Holy Oysters, a French Pop/Psychedelic band, are releasing their self titled EP this November, and have already amassed attention with their lead single ‘Take Me For a Ride’, released earlier this month. The five piece (2 Guitars, Bass, Keys, Drums), funky, synth heavy, band is destined for popularity on the airwaves.

Their Pop/Psychedelic aesthetic comes as a surprise, as France’s music scene has an established platform for producing glitch and electronica acts like Justice, Daft Punk and C2C, and has owned that reputation like London owns its grime scene. However, Holy Oysters’ influences are transparent and instantly recognisable as they take ideas from all over the musical spectrum from Sticky Fingers to LoneLady, Muse to Everything Everything. But in attempting to master a variety of styles, Holy Oysters’ vast influences are a poisoned chalice.

‘Take Me For A Ride’ opens the EP, with an MGMT ‘Time to Pretend’ vibe, and a simple drumbeat reminiscent of the basic high school Keyboard Drum samples. But otherwise, the leading track sets the funky mood for the 25 minute long EP. In fact, that reminiscent/nostalgic feeling says a lot about their EP, and their hooks are constantly bringing up close similarities to other artists, that tread the fine line between imitation and plagiarism. ‘Kaleidoscope’s hook, addictive though it is, sounds suspiciously like a cross between Justice’s ‘Horsepower’ and ‘Phantom’ with a Sitar introduction deviously similar to The Gaslamp Killer’s ‘Nissim’. ‘Supersonic’, the final track, has an identical chorus to Muse’s ‘Plug in Baby’, and ‘Oh’s chorus is lifted from Take That’s ‘Shine’. The rest of the track resembles an Everything Everything song left on the cutting floor.

After stating the obvious transparencies in the bands influences, the rest of the EP is positive. Although they have their flaws, ‘Holy Oysters’ make up for it with incredibly catchy riffs, beats, and a unique vocal style that rivals that of Joe Newman from alt-J. The range of eclectic instruments really does help set them apart from the standard Pop band. Intricate Guitar solos, interesting Bass licks, and some crunchy 80’s synths are what ‘Holy Oysters’ are at heart. Whether this qualifies as psychedelic isn’t our call, but one thing is for certain, Holy Oysters are not your typical run of the mill Pop band.

Holy Oysters is out on November 23rd via holyoysters.com

Holy Oysters 'Holy Oysters' - EP REVIEW

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