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New York based indie-rock band We Are Scientists returned to Liverpool on Wednesday night for the first time since they graced the 02 Academy back in 2010. Bringing their ‘Helter Seltzer’ tour to the East Village Arts Club, bassist Chris Cain informed the crowd that it had been ‘around 340,000’ minutes since the band last played in Liverpool, before storming through a triumphant set that was well worth the wait.

Walking on stage to Lionel Richie’s ‘Hello’, it was obvious that the crowd were in for a fun night. Kicking things off with ‘Impatience’ from their 2008 album ‘Brain Thrust Mastery’, Keith Murray lived up to his reputation of being an animated front man whilst jumping around the stage, flicking his trademark grey hair about in the process. We Are Scientists are notorious for their live shows – their performances ooze with an enthusiasm that’s shared by the crowd and could easily be seen in the circle pit that the instantaneous riff of ‘Nobody Move, Nobody Get Hurt’ was responsible for.

Every riff and vocal triggered a huge reaction and despite their new album having only been released in April, the stomping chorus of leading single ‘Buckle’ sparked the same mass sing a long as hits such as ‘The Great Escape’ and ‘I Don’t Bite’. When the band weren’t delivering what felt like hit after hit, they were having on stage banter that you’d pay to see alone. A fan favourite which bassist Chris Cain got heckled for just two songs in was the engine noises that he can create with his bass, deafening (and impressing) the crowd and his band mates in the process.

It’s not just on stage where We Are Scientists can be praised for their rapport with both the audience and each other – with a crowd as fired up as them, the band don’t take this for granted and ‘Textbook’ saw Murray head down from the stage and straight over the barrier, where he posed for photographs, drank a fans beer and eventually received a shoulder ride back to the stage (all without missing a note, which is well worth adding!)

Unfortunately every great gig has to come to an end and the band left the stage with beaming smiles and full of gratitude, before returning for their inevitable encore of ‘Cash Cow’, ‘After Hours’ (featuring a couple of crowd surfers collaborating with Murray on vocals) and their new single; the chorus heavy ‘Too Late’.

After ten years of tirelessly entertaining the indie-rock scene, We Are Scientists are certainly the King’s of putting on an exhilarating show that provides everything you could want; from tracks of a nostalgic nature to new material that highlights the bands musical development since their 2006 breakthrough album ‘With Love and Squalor’. A combination of the crowd reaction and the bands performance in the East Village Arts Club was enough confirmation for me that there wouldn’t be as large a gap between Liverpool shows in the future!We Are Scientists - Arts Club Liverpool (19th Oct 2016)

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