Closing a short yet entertaining tour around the country, The Midnight Beast came back to their home of London to perform a loud, proud, and energetic set of old tunes, brand new hits, and what brought them to the mainstream in the first place: parodies.

Opening the show with two true fan favourites, “Lez Be Friends” and “The Dance Routine”, this was when the comedy trio first showed off that there are parts of their musical past they will never forget. During the latter, all members – Stefan “Stef” Abingdon, Ashley “Ash” Horne, and Andrew “Dru” Wakely – perfectly executed ‘The Dance Routine’ from their music video. With no live use of instruments and group choreography, it seemed that the show would be the trio running and jumping around the stage with their mics. However, this was not the case as they made the unexpected transition from a vocal group to what can be classified as a ‘real’ band.

With Abingdon and Horne playing lead and bass guitar respectively, Wakely accompanying them on drums, they played a string of hits from their self-titled album – most of which were made famous through the band’s E4 television show, first airing in 2012. Playing a medley of songs such as the apocalyptic “Begging”; the eccentric anthem “Quirky”; and the financially coping “Medium Pimpin’”. Bringing a sense of nostalgia for many fans in the crowd, most of whom were likely teenagers when watching the band’s television show, it proved that The Midnight Beast have made an impact among the younger generations, as well as their own.

Changing up the setlist of their own original songs, they performed their parody of the 2009 dance hit “Down” – centred more around one’s trousers dropping unexpectedly than a random woman. Taking themselves and their fans back to their humble beginnings, their YouTube roots, the whole room was still singing and dancing and laughing along. This would not be the last time they play a YouTube-exclusive parody that night.

 

The crowd always plays a great part in any band’s show, and no crowd is like one that gathers at a London gig. And further on, there is no crowd like a crowd that gathers for The Midnight Beast. One of the most humorous crowd moments was during the group’s performance of pop parody “Just Another Boyband”, after the final chorus line of, “After the shows we keep your underwear” a fan threw a pair of underwear onstage, gathering laughs from the band and onlookers. Another hilarious moment was during the newer song “Sextape”, when Horne split everyone in two sections: one singing, “You can be my ho”, and the other chanting “Hey!” near the end of the number. For many standing in that audience, these newer songs are not-so-familiar ones, being from their latest album ‘The Album Nobody Asked For.’ Crowd participation is a genius way of introducing newer tunes to the fans; this can also applies for older tunes.

The highest level of participation came from the mash-up of “Friends For Never” and “Daddy”. Playing it off as a skit, Abingdon and Horne asked the audience if they wanted Wakely to perform or if they wanted to hear the song. When the applause was evident for the latter, Wakely sat at the edge of the stage, watching and drinking down cider. The main participation came from the crowd singing along: with this song combination, the crowd sang most of the verses from “Friends For Never” and the whole of the chorus for “Daddy” with very little input from the band. Perfectly.

That is true trust in fans.

For the encore, the comedy became prop-based. Performing Harry Potter parody “Wands”, the trio came back out with hoods over their heads and waving around LED wands. For the sexually silly “Booty Call”, each member pranced around a pom-pom.

They closed the show with the song that launched them to popularity nearly nine years ago on YouTube: their world-famous cover of Ke$ha’s “Tik Tok”. With the iconic dance, the crowd beginning the number with a chorus singalong, and bursts of colourful confetti, it was a fantastic end to a funny night and a funny tour.

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